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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
arrived in baghdad for his trip in pakistan. nice to see you. >> i'm away. you're away. >> we're here. >> anyway. let's talk about leon panetta. >> yeah. >> the old unannounced visit. it will be a mark -- one of the things that really pointing out is accusations of iran arming iraqi insurgents using the weapons, obviously, against u.s. troops. i've been there 11 times. they used to say this years ago, that the iranians were providing technology as the charges that were doing so much damage to u.s. armored vehicles. now they're talking about it being rockets and things like that, upping the ante in terms of the weaponry. and leon panetta saying the u.s. won't stand for that. they'll protect the troops. last month was a bad month for u.s. troops. more than a dozen troops were kills in iraq. worst month in two years, exactly two years. >> is there a message here from iran as we start to pull -- as u.s. starts to pull troops out of iraq? they're supposed to be out by the end of this year? >> yeah, well, you know, iran had a lot of influence in iraq really for years now. it's one of the by
of a former british prime minister. and pakistan's reaction to news that the united states government is cutting millions of dollars in military aid. i'll talk to the country's ambassador to the united states about the growing tension and the impact on the war on terror. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." the federal debt is soaring high or above the limit almost by the second. and president obama is vowing to hold daily negotiations to raise the ceiling if that's what it takes. another round of talks broke up just a little while ago without repeat any break through. with 22 days left the president says he won't accept the stop gap plan to prevent america from defaulting on its debts. he used a news conference this morning to challenge both parties and to lay down some markers. >> i will not sign a 30-day or a 60-day or a 90-day extension. that's just not an acceptable approach. and if we think it's going to be hard, if we think it's hard now, imagine how these guys are going to be thinking six months from now in the middle of election season when they're all up. it's n
, pakistan telling america, keep your money, after the u.s. announced it's withholding $800 million in military aid. this is more evidence of the growing rift between the u.s. and pakistan. white house chief of staff william daly says it's in response to pakistan's decision to cut back on counterterrorism operations after the killing of osama bin laden. the u.s. typically gives pakistan more than $2 billion a year in security assistance. >>> u.s. joint chiefs of staff admiral -- chairman admiral mike mullen says china should no longer be described as a rising power, declaring it's a full-fledged world power hp he made the remarks at the start of a four-day visit to beijing. he called on china to become a global partner in addressing security challenges in asia and beyond. >>> jay si dugard speaking about her 18 years in captivity at the hands of philly and nancy garrido. she was 11 when kidnapped by garrido, a convicted sex offender, as she was walking to school. she talked about the long, horrifying ordeal with abc's diane sawyer. >> you would never know what she survived unless yo
efforts with pakistan. currently the u.k. is the second-largest of the foreign military force in afghanistan. from london, this is just under an hour. >> thank you, mr. speaker. with permission i would like to make a statement on afghanistan. formerly i said this government has sought to take a more hard hit security based approach to the mission.vernment as i've said, we are not there to build a perfect democracy, still a model society.re yes, we will help with the detablishment of demographicild institutions and yes, we can improve infrastructure, develop education, encourage democrac development, but we are in afghanistan. we can improve infrastructure, develop education and encourage development the we are in afghanistan for one overriding reason, to shore our own national security by helping the afghans take control of theirs. that means building up security forces to drive down british combat forces where the afghans themselves able to prevent al qaeda from returning and posing a threat to us and our allies around the world. this is poignant today on a plot executed by a
, in pakistan rather. >> today we honor a singular act of gallantry. as we near the 10th anniversary of the attacks thrust our nation into war, it is the occasion to pay tribute to a soldier and a generation that has borne the burden of our security during a hard decade of sacrifice. i want to take you back to the circumstances that led to this day. it is may 26, 2008. in the remote eastern afghanistan, near the mountainous border of pakistan. helicopters carrying dozens of a lead army rangers race over the rugged landscape. and their target is an insurgent, down. the mission is high risk. it is broad daylight. the insurgents are heavily armed. but it is considered a risk worth taking because intelligence indicates that a top al qaeda commander is in that compound. soon the helicopters touched down, and our rangers immediately come under fire. within minutes, leroy -- then a staff sergeant -- and another soldier are pushing ahead into a courtyard surrounded by high mud walls. that is when the enemy opens up with their a k-47's. leroy is hit in both legs. he's bleeding badly. but he s
data move fearlessly through the clouds means more than ever. >>> pakistan is detaining a doctor suspected of working with the cia in an elaborate ruse. it was reportedly designed to get dna samples from people inside the compound where it turned out osama bin laden was living. joining us now from islamabad, resa saya. walk us through what happened here. this is a pretty intriguing spy story, if you will. what happened? >> reporter: yeah, it's a fascinating glimpse, look, at the lengths the cia was going to find the location of bin laden in abbottabad. a pakistani security official is telling us the pakistani doctor is in custody suspected of helping the cia set up an intricate plot to confirm the whereabouts of osama bin laden. according to this official he set up a free vaccination campaign to offer a free vaccination to the people of abbottabad where bin laden's compound was located. this doctor hired two nurses going around town from house to house, the plan towas to find t bin laden kids, to match their dna with the dna of bin laudedl sister who passed away in massachuset ma
it to pakistan? a secret letter that might hold some clues is in the hands of a washington reporter. >>> a court hearing this howard for jared loughner. his doctors say he's dangerous even behind bars. >>> in bring, the popular "news of the world" is done after this sunday, but the investigation is not over, and journalists aren't the only target of investigators. you're in "the situation room." >>> a lot of hard bargaining ahead as the president and congressional leaders try to hammer out a deal on raising the federal debt limit as the august 2nd deadline looms, most parties are firming up their bottom lines. joining me now is senator tom coburn from oklahoma. senator, i know that you have today pentagon with speaker boehner about the republican position, or at least his position going into these debt talks. what can you tell me about where you are now when it comes to the revenue side of this equation? >> well, i think speaker boehner related that everything is on the table. i think it should be. i think that's the only way we solve this problem for our country, so i think it will be a compone
pipeline, iran-pakistan-india. the u.s. state department stood up and said, this is not going to happen. does it go through anyway as a litmus test? >> i think what was unfortunate is the problem between india and pakistan, that they didn't want -- on continuedian side to rely on the gas on going through pakistan. they thought maybe it should be offshore and so on. i think as far as iran and pakistan is concerned or the two are concerned, the deal is going quite a long way ahead on the iranian side. on the pakistani side there is so many announcements. of course, over 20 years, announcements are announcements, but they seem a bit more serious. >> pipeline politics indeed. it's become a major source of contention between lebanon and israel. they're warning israel to stay away from the country's energy resources but leaders of the hezbollah group calls on them for an energy exploration. maritime dispute over who owns what are escalating already heightened tensions between two countries. we take a special look. >> reporter: under the warm waters of the mediterranean may lie treasures yet u
to stand up and do the tough things. >> let me turn to pakistan, quickly, there's an article in the "new york times" today, saying that the money is being reduced to pakistan, hundreds of billions of dollars. the president came in, saying that he would agree to bring pakistan to the table with more aid. has that policy failed and is therera change of policy now? >> it's not changed -- it's not failed, pardon me. the truth of the matter is, our relationship with pakistan has been complicated. obviously, they're an important ally on the fight of terrorism. a victim of enormous amounts of terrorism. right now they've taken steps to given us reason to pause on the aid which we're giving to the military and we're trying to work through that. it's a complicated relationship and a very difficult complicated part of the board. obviously there's still a lot of pain that the political system in pakistan is feeling by virtue of the raid that we did to get osama bin laden. something that the president felt strongly about. we have no regrets over. but the pakistani relationship is difficult, but it m
to be charged with a crime, not clear why he's been picked up. what we do know is pakistan has said they haven't been happy with how this operation was conducted, this unilateral operation by the u.s. they call it a violation of their sovereignty. there could be a number of reasons why they have taken him into custody. could be payback against washington, it could be payback against these pakistanis that allegedly helped the cia. another plausible reason could be they want to find out how the cia established a very intricate intelligence network here in pakistan on their soil behind the government's back, randi. >> this may say quite a bit, really, about u.s./pakistani relationships. >> reporter: it certainly does. at this point, those relationships are not good and this is an indication that at least when it comes to the bin laden operation and some intelligence gathering, these are two countries that despite advertising themselves as partners, they're not on the same page. certainly, in fairness to pakistan, we should note that if american citizen was helping pakistani spy services on americ
a pakistan on this particular trip. did he talk about what pakistan was not on his itinerary? guest: he did not talk about that specifically. it was very focused on afghanistan, but also on the border between afghanistan and pakistan. he did not say specifically why he did not go. i think it is pretty clear for a couple of reasons. the u.s. is trying to gauge just how much cooperation they can get from pakistan going forward. pakistan has a lot of u.s. trainers that have been working intensely with their special forces, and as a result of that, withheld some of the decade that went with them. they also repelled some of the partnership on the war on terrorism, so to speak. they are still trying to gauge that. for now, in the past, the key relationship between the u.s. and pakistan and the military have been between admiral mullen and his pakistan counterpart, the army chief of staff. i think that this point, the u.s. is still trying to weigh what they can do to move this cooperation forward with pakistan. host: the defense policy reporter a bloomberg news, thank you for being on the "washing
as well. pat. >> dr. brzezinski, let me talk to you about pakistan. powers flu out, richard nixon tilted, doctor brzezinski was over there looking down the pass. they were a great ally in the cold war. now it looks like we have lost pakistan. have we lost pakistan? if so, why and was it inevitable. >> i think we are losing pakistan. i don't know if we have lost it yet. if we disengage intelligently and engage in the umbrella i have been talking about, her happens we will lose it all together. i think the fault is two way. first of all, we have never been really consistently and comprehensively sensitive to the political interests in having a secure backyard in afghanistan. we just haven't. resently, we played with indi s indians. we give a super nuclear deal to the indians. we did not give it to the pakistanis. there's resentment there. pakistan is coming undone on its own. it's not all our undoing. there's a conflict between the army and society at large. divisions between the army and the military and intelligence. ethnic differences. regional differences in pakistan. plus, this overw
. >>> a suspected u.s. drone strike in pakistan's remote tribal region killing 13 alleged militants. the target was an insurgent hideout in the area of south what zeer tan along the afghanistan border. >>> two new york men arrested and accused of stealing thousands of dollars of rare documents from the maryland historical sign. one is barry lando. among the documents reportedly stolen papers side by abraham lincoln, some worth $300,000. >>> this guy didn't ask for a dime, but the irs might come after the guy who caught derek jeter's 3,000th hit. home run into left field bleachers on saturday. "the new york times" talked to tax lawyers who say the fan who owes $100,000 in student loans may owe taxes on gifts from the yankees. the team gave him great seats. right? >> like $1500 great seats. >> yeah. >> and they also gave him luxury box tickets for the rest of the year. >> this is our question of the day. do you think yankee fans christian lopez would have been better off not catching jeter's home run? send us an e-mail, tweet, tell us on facebook. we'll read some of your thoughts at the end of th
of these people, especially in scandinavia have gone to somalia, gone to pakistan, afghanistan, linked up with various jihadist groups, some of them have been trained in bomb making, assassinations, and they've come back. and if there's one thing that worries authorities across the world it's those people who are residents of europe, who have gone overseas and have come back trained and ready to give their lives or to create mayhem. >> how will they go about trying to find out who it is? what will they be looking for right now on the scene? >> one thing we know is that the intelligence agencies have been on the high state of alert for the last nine months. now they're going to pour much more resources into that. who's involved, which mosques may have been basis for militancy, for example. they'll want to find as much forensic evidence from the bomb, its packaging, maybe a vehicle identification number, cttv from the area, all of that will come into place straight away. the most important thing they get is the signature of the bomb or what was -- what it was in, what was carrying it, was i
states is encouraged by the ongoing talks between nuclear armed rivals india and pakistan and promises to give full support to indian efforts to protect itself from whatever. a triple bombing killed 20 people in mumbai. a spokesman says a the country had been stalling new and efficient centrifuges aimed at speeding up its nuclear enrichment. tehran may be moving toward weapon-grade arms. he did not elaborate on the specifications of the machines bank in london, rupert murdoch has arrived at britain's parliament ahead of his appearance before lawmakers. he will be questioned about the investigation that brought down the newspaper. his son and rebekah brooks are also expected to appear. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> the c-span network -- we provide coverage of politics, public affairs, nonfiction books, and american history. it is all available to you. find our content any time throughout c-span's video library. bringing our resources to your community. is washington, -- it is washington, your way. >> ann coulter has something to say. sunday, august 7, your c
campaign been ongoing in pakistan and some cases yemen, we've taken out something like 1200 fighters from al qaeda including senior leaders. jon: right. >> this is all good news. but again the ideology of radical islam lives on and so do these affiliate groups. that is the challenge ahead of us. jon: if you take out those leaders, and we have been very successful in doing that, if you take out people who have experience going back to the russian-afghan war, take out the people who know how to motivate and organization and maybe build a bomb be, pretty soon you're left with bunch of 18, 20-year-old kids who may have the desire but don't necessarily have the knowledge to continue terrorism campaign? >> well, you know i think you could make that argument but you could also argue you have a number of people who gained experience in afghanistan. people who have gained experience and by the way, fighting in this more recent war, not in the war in the 1980s against the soviets. but rather fighting against the united states and allied forces. you have people that have had experience in iraq and o
knowledge on the ground. so the whereabouts of mullah omar are unknown. last believed to be in pakistan, where taliban militants have launched attacks across that border against troops down in the southern region. it's those southern and eastern regions of afghanistan that have experienced some of the highest levels of attacks. and this all comes at a very interesting time. we're seeing a hand over of seven key areas across the country to afghan security force. as those hand overs have taken place we've seen an uptick in attacks and assassination attempts, and successful attempts at that. half brother of president karzai was killed last week as well as a senior advisor to him earlier this week. so, again, a critical time here in afghanistan, and allegations of a hacking by the taliban. >> david, good to see you. thank you very much. we'll keep on top of the story with you. >>> close to now a dozen declared gop presidential candidates now but still many voters are asking who else have you got? a lot of republicans, especially those on the christian right are saying they want texas govern
and operations really pick up in places like yemen and somalia. of course, top concerns always pakistan and what's going on inside that country and north korea and perhaps the number one target, if you will, for gathering intelligence about what they are up to may well be iran. the u.s. believes iran is really trying to extend its influence in both afghanistan and iraq and around the world. there will be a lot of effort over the coming years to see what iran is up to. general petraeus in charge of all of that now as director petraeus. we will see if he gives up the nickname he had for so many years since he attended west point where his cadet, fellow cadet buddies, used to call him peaches petraeus. >> where's the peaches come from? >> you know, guys at the academy, they just sort of make stuff up. i found out recently that amongst his buddies, his fellow former cadets, many of them now two, three, four-star generals themselves, that name peaches petraeus has stuck over the years. close friends, amongst others, maybe behind his back. not too much to his face. he's often called king david petraeu
laden had been living in a house in pakistan just an hour away from islamabad. helicopters raided the compound and landed a group of u.s. navy seals in a burst of gunfire, the al qaeda leader was killed, his body was. i see. americans celebrated his death in the world wondered about retaliation. i minister david cameron addressed the comment. >> we should remember in particular the brave servicemen and women from britain was given their lives in the fight against terrorism across the world. we should pay tribute especially to the british forces who played their part over the last decade in the hunt for bin laden. he was the man who is responsible for 9/11, which was not only an horrific killing of americans, but remains to this day the largest loss of british life in any terrorist attack. as that of the family group for united airlines flight 93 put it, we erased obviously never to hope for some and that. we are willing to make the section in this case. our world is a better place without him. >> of understanding satisfaction of those who lost family members in the inferno of 9/11
in pakistan just an hour away from islama bad. they raided the congresswoman pound. and in the burst of gun fire, the al qaeda leader was killed and his body buried at sea. as america celebrated and the world wondered about retaliation . >> we should remember in particular the brave servicemen and women who gave their lives against terrorism across the world and pay tribute to the british forces who played their part over the last decade in the hunt for bin laden. he was responsible for 9/11. which was not only a horrific killing of americans but remains to this day the largest loss of british life in any terrorist attack. as a head of a family group of flight 93 put it, we are willing to make an exception in this case. he was evil personified and our world is a better place without him. >> while understanding the satisfaction and elation of those who lost family members on 9/11, my friend agrees that the sober reality is that some things are unchanged by the death of osama bin laden. the threat remains and jihad must be confronted and adequate resources, effective international cooperation
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)

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